Professor Steven J. Eagle named as the recipient of the 2019 Brigham-Kanner Property Rights Prize

Steven J. Eagle, Professor of Law

“[Eagle] has devoted much of his life and his prodigious energy toward analyzing the constitutional nuances embedded in real estate law,” Berger said. “His deeply thought out analyses provide major contributions to the body of law examining and explaining the Fifth Amendment’s final (and almost forgotten) clause. His recognition with the Brigham-Kanner Prize is well deserved.”

www.law.wm.edu, Feb. 12

Scalia Law Professor J.W. Verret on bipartisanship behind the International Insurance Standards Act

J. W. Verret, Associate Professor of Law

In recent years, a slow creep of nationalization has threatened state insurance regulation, as federal agencies and trade negotiators have increasingly recognized the authority of international regulatory bodies to impose global standards on American insurance firms. H.R. 4537, the International Insurance Standards Act, introduced by Reps. Sean Duffy (R-Wis.) and Denny Heck (D-Wash.), would defend the state-based system by reforming the power of American officials to negotiate insurance agreements abroad

thehill.com, Dec. 10

Scalia Law Professor Adam White on civil service modernization

Adam White, Assistant Professor and Executive Director, The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State

We saw ways in which, at least at a very general level, you can get basic agreement to modernize our civil service, modernize the agencies, make them more efficient, more productive, more accountable and more modern.

federalnewsnetwork.com, Dec. 10

Professor Thomas P. Vartanian on Regulation Relief

Thomas P. Vartanian, Founder & Executive Director of Scalia Law’s  Financial Regulation & Technology Institute

Recent steps by the Congress and the Treasury, Federal Reserve Board, Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. suggest a welcome departure from the trend of one-size-fits-all rules — and a return to principles-based regulation anchored in regulatory common sense and sound financial judgment.

Americanbanker.com, Sept. 21